St. Louis Globe-Democrat Photographs: General Subjects

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Cutting Out Sheets For the Newspaper
Man is cutting out sheets for the newspapers.
Damaged Residential Building
This photo of a destroyed residential building looks as if the building was cut in half; doors are still visible in what is standing, as are windows and fireplaces. There is a group of men cleaning at the bottom of the photo, scooping up the debris into large carts.
Debris of War
"Unrecognizable heaps of rubble and empty skeletons of buildings greeted U.S. infantrymen who marched into Septsarges on the Meuse River after the town was wrested from the Germans in the First World War."
Deceased Soldiers in the Field
This photo of a battlefield and its casualties is an expansive scene of debris and tall grasses. In the foreground of the photograph lies heaps of deceased soldiers, and there are two walking soldiers in the back right corner parallel to the dark field.
Deceased and Their Belongings
This photo shows a line of battle casualties in various states of damage. Behind the line of men are small piles of clothing and other belongings. In the background of the photo, there are a small bunch of soldiers standing to the left of the line and there are larger, oddly shaped objects in the back right.
Demolished Neighborhood
This photo shows a demolished French neighborhood with still standing buildings in the background. The ones in the foreground are gutted, and almost entirely broken down.
Destroyed Houses
This photo shows one or two soldiers squatted near destroyed homes in the rubble of their destruction. The photo is taken from the edge of the road, and the road curves to the left as it continues through the photo. Houses in shambles line the road on the right, whereas there is only one visible house on the left.
Destruction of a French Town
This photo shows a soldier standing in the rubble of a French town. The buildings are collapsing down into the street. There are piles of stone and wood against the remainders of the buildings. The store signs still remain.
Doctors on the Battlefield
In this photo, a military doctor is kneeling next to the stretchers of injured soldiers and talking to them as another soldier tends to them; others being carried away covered in a blanket.
Doodlebug Thanksgiving Day Float
"Preparation for a Parade - Workmen adjust eye of a "Doodlebug", one of 29 floats in the annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade that will get underway Thursday in New York City. The floats were built at the parade warehouse in Hoboken, N.J. under the supervision of Manfred Bass, float designer."
Doughnuts for Doughboys
This photo shows an American soldier, or Doughboy, eating doughnuts outside of the Odeon Theater in Paris, France where the 1918 film "America's Answer" was playing.
Dryden Trophy
"U.S. Infantry, Holder of the Dryden, Wingate and Sadler Trophies, to Defend Honors in Rifle Matches./The U.S, Infantry, now the present champions and holders of the Dryden, Wingate and Sadler Trophies, will defend their prizes at the New Jersey State Rifle Association meet at Camp Perry, Ohio. The Dryden trophy was presented by the late John F. Dryden, U.S. Senator of New Jersey. The Wingate trophy was presented by General Wingate for annual competition on off-shoulder shooting. The Sadler trophy was presented by General Wilbor F. Sadler, Jr. It is open to teams of eight from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, National guard, Civilian Teams, and School teams./Photo shows L.R. the Wingate, Dryden, and Sadler trophies which the U.S. Infantry team will defend in coming matches."
Electric Fence Around Radio Plant
"Barbed Wire Fence Charged With High Current Surrounds Country's Largest Radio Plant./Seven foot barbed wire fence which surrounds country's largest radio plant at Challos Heights near San Diego, Calif./Photo also shows U.S. soldier on guard, one of the detachment that patrols the grounds of the station day and night./The plant is the largest station in the United States. The towers are over 600 feet in height. Messages from this plant have been sent to Berlin and received from that city./Washington recently ordered that the station be carefully guarded and a barbed wire fence seven feet high was erected around the grounds. The wire is charged with 30,000 volts. In addition to this effective barrier the plant is guarded day and night by the U.S. Soldiers. No one is permitted entrance to the station or surrounding territory unless properly identified and vouched for."
England Memorial Day
"Memorial Day Observed in England, Honors Paid to Our Dead./Memorial Day was observed in England with fitting ceremonies at all cemeteries where American soldiers and sailors are buried. These photos were made at the Brookwodd Cemetery near London, the upper showing American soldiers, Y.M.C.A.; Red Cross and K.F.C. workers decorating graves and the lower firing the last salute over the graves of the dead Americans."
Enlistment Ads
This photo shows five different ads for enlistment in the military to fight for the British Empire. The first in the upper left corner reads, "Another Call/"More men and still more until the enemy is crushed."/Lord Kitchener". Beneath this one, at the bottom left, it says, "There's room for YOU/ENLIST to-day". There is a poster in the middle where only "Enlist to-day" is visible. In the bottom right is "The Key to the Situation/Munitions, Men, and Money/Are YOU helping to turn it?" These words are organized in such a way where the three M's are on the teeth of the key. The last poster at the top right of the photo has two quotes from Lord Kitchener, and says, "Men of London/Now is the Time/Come forward now and be trained to do your share./Every fit man owes this duty to himself and to his country."
Family Painting a House
"In the second Thanksgiving of World War II many Americans are thankful for homes of their own, be they ever so humble, in a time when families are being uprooted and homes destroyed by the ravages of War. Here, in a typical scene, the whole family joins in the painting of the house."
Famous Names Contest Entries
These well known St. Louisans are up to their necks in the task of examining some of the thousands of entries in the Globe-Democrat's "Famous Names" contest. They will certify the winning entries within a few days. They are, left to right: Frank C. Hamilton, president of the the St. Louis Advertising Club; Thomas N. Dysart, president of the St. Louis Chamber of Commerce; James J. Fitzgerald, president of the Board of Education; Mayor Dickmann, and Nelson R. Darragh, president of the Better Business Bureau.
Farmerettes in World War I
"Ladies Into Farmarettes/They were called ladies and wore long skirts or - for some activities - bloomers, but the female of the species kept the home fires burning in World War I. They marched in parades, boosted sales of Liberty Bonds, practiced Home Defense tactics, took up gardening in backyards and on golf courses. These farmerettes were students and faculty members of Western College at Oxford, Ohio."
Fashion and Feature Editor
Fashion and feature editor Jeanne Contini of New York turns out a full page every day. All dressed up, she has come back from a social function to write it up.
Fatso Reunion Weight Check
Larry Fields (Lower Right) checks Lee Coffee's Weight. Others at Fatso Reunion (from left): Bob Protzel, Henry Yehlen, Rev. Marc Zill, and Vernon Bader.
Field Communication
Photograph of a portable communication machine in the field during the war. The machine is receiving service. There are many soldiers standing around the machine, and they're smoking cigarettes as they work on the mechanics.
Fifth and Sixth Marines Returning
"Fifth and Sixth Marines Returning on George Washington./Members of the Fifth and Sixth Regiments of Marines "Leathernecks" tickled to death to see Hoboken, N. J. once more after their famous service in France - Photographed as transport George Washington approached pier - Carried 139 officers and 3,714 enlisted men./Photo of George Washington arriving with Marines."
First Thanksgiving Re-Enactment
"Re-enacting America's first Thanksgiving are Virginians who gathered at Berkeley Plantation, Va., where thanks was given by colonists from England on Dec. 4, 1619 - a year and 17 days before the Pilgrims landed in New England. H. J. Broughton of Norge, Va., portrayed Capt. John Woodliffe, Governor of Berkeley Colony."
First Thanksgiving in America
"Woonsocket, Rhode Island, Nov. 24 - First Thanksgiving in a New Land - Four-year-old Sengthavy Sengsourya gets first hand examination of his first Thanksgiving turkey Wednesday night. His parents, Laotian refugees who fled to the U.S. from Thailand last December, were preparing for their first Thanksgiving Day dinner in their new homeland."
Flight Attendant at Trans World Airlines
A Flight Attendant at Trans World Airlines feeds a passenger's baby.
For Its Patriotic Contribution
For its patriotic contribution to the war effort in obtaining the enlistment of recruits for service in the construction battalions of the navy, popularly known as Seabees, the Globe-Democrat has been presented with this award of merit.
French Citizens Greeting American Soldiers
"Two venerable citizens of La Belle France have warm greetings for a couple of American doughboys who have just moved into their town."
French Emissaries Entering Car
"Compiegne Forest, France, June 21 - Four French emissaries are shown about to enter the 1918 armistice care here today, where they heard Hitler give his terms for peace. Entering the car is a German officer who acted as escort. Several feet behind him is Gen. Charles Huntzinger of France, and in the center of the photo, behind the post, is Leon Noel of France. Toward the right are Gen. Jean Marie Bergeret and Rear Admiral Maurice Athanase Lelug. Unidentified German attendants are in the back of the officer entering th car and in back of Special Evoy Noel. Inside, they saw Hitler sit where Marshal Foch sat in 1918; and they heard Der Feuhrer demand a complete surrender of France."

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